5 best TV shows of 2016

5 best TV shows of 2016

Westworld

HBO’s Westworld is appointment television, and in the tepid waters of TV drama these days, it’s a rare creature. The tale of androids in an amusement park unfolds with the twists and turns of a complex maze – which can be inexplicable and frustrating for viewers if done poorly, but under the hands of Westworld’s able writers, become subtle clues that are debated endlessly on Internet message boards. Westworld is more amazing still for inciting a sense of pathos in viewers, making them think deep thoughts about the depravity of humankind while being entertained at the same time. It’s a show where every episode demands a rewatch – miss even a single tiny detail, and one may miss a crucial plot insight. And when the final episode finally lands, the clues come together like pieces of a well-made puzzle. The pay off is satisfying and jaw dropping. Television has never felt this perfect. – Elizabeth Tai

Stranger Things

Created by Matt and Ross Duffer, the science fiction horror TV series by Netflix, Stranger Things, grabs one’s attention from the get go. The opening credits are super duper, it stars Winona Ryder, and introduces a bunch of child actors who are terrifically charismatic. For me, it is like a cross between Stand By Me or Wonder Years and Fringe. And the series is captivating enough to keep me glued from start to finish. Millie Bobby Brown (she plays Eleven) is my favourite new star and she’s been making her presence felt off screen too! Set in the 1980s, the plot is simple enough – a young boy disappears, a strange telekinetic girl appears and helps his friends look for him, while the missing boy’s older brother, his mother (Ryder playing a cuckoo mum on the brink of a breakdown), and the town police chief all branch out into investigations of their own. Very compelling watch, and certainly brings back the intrigue, wonder and drama of yesteryear TV. – Ann Marie Chandy

From left, Caleb McLaighlin (Lucas), Finn Wolfhard (Mike), Millie Bobby Brown (El) and Gaten Matarazzo (Dustin) are the young stars of Stranger Things.

From left, Caleb McLaighlin (Lucas), Finn Wolfhard (Mike), Millie Bobby Brown (El) and Gaten Matarazzo (Dustin) are the young stars of Stranger Things.

The Crown

Netflix continues its winning streak in 2016 with The Crown, a series which chronicles the life of Queen Elizabeth II, starting with her marriage to Prince Philip in 1947. While Claire Foy holds court as the monarch, playing the character with much constrain and cool, it is John Lithgow who steals the show every time his character, Prime Minister Winston Churchill, comes on screen. Written by Peter Morgan – who is on familiar grounds having tackled the role of screenwriter in the 2006 film The QueenThe Crown presents us an insider look at the world-famous monarchy. And the lives of the royals are not far different from ours – sibling rivalry, (scandalous) family drama, marital issues, office politics, loneliness, internal turmoil, you name it – which makes this drama captivating. With a price tag of US$100mil (for two seasons), Netflix went all out for this production, which features lush landscapes and opulent settings. – Gordon Kho

Photo: Handout

Photo: Handout

This Is Us

There is nothing outrageous about This Is Us. It’s a typical family drama that tugs at our heartstrings. Love, loss, loyalty, betrayal — they’re all there. Be prepared to shed tears, roll with laughter and shriek with glee as the story of the Pearsons unfolds. The only difference with this new series (which garnered three Golden Globe nominations) is the plot twists that show creator Dan Fogelman cleverly inserts at the end of some episodes. Curveballs aplenty, at least in the first half of the series. The series is told both in flashbacks and real time and viewers have to piece the story together through details that are revealed both in the past and present. It keeps this otherwise typical family drama fresh and us on our toes. The best part for me is the characters: Really rich, layered characters who I have come to care about brought to life so well by a stellar cast that includes Milo Ventimiglia, Sterling K. Brown, Justin Hartley, Mandy Moore and Chrissy Metz. S. Indramalar

The Good Place

The Good Place

The Good Place

Is there life after death? This comedy by Michael Shur – who co-created Brooklyn Nine-Nine and Parks And Recreation – shows a version of heaven called The Good Place. Since this is a comedy, there are plenty of out-there elements on the show including a yoghurt shop at every corner, a celestial being named Janet who can provide you with anything you desire, flying lessons (literally flying!) and getting a dream house built according to your personality. This neighbourhood, however, becomes a little bad when new arrival Eleanor (Kristen Bell) turns out to be a person who was mean, rude and selfish on earth. How in the (after) world does a mistake like this happen where everything is supposed to be perfect? As Eleanor tries to hide this fact from the person in charge (Ted Danson) she creates an imbalance at the place. With so much peculiarity, the show keeps its audience guessing as to what happens next. It also benefts from the talents of actors Bell and Danson, who just make everything that much funnier. – Mumtaj Begum




share this article to: Facebook Twitter Google+ Linkedin Technorati Digg
Posted by ADMIN, Published at 13:14 and have 0 comments

No comments:

Post a Comment